H.M.S. Hood Today
Places Connected with H.M.S. Hood
Updated 19-Mar-2014

Here you'll find information highlighting several places/locations connected with or related to H.M.S. Hood and crew. If you know of a place which isn't mentioned here, please contact our staff.

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Hood Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum (photo courtesy of David Evans Hood Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum
This elegant memorial was commemorates the 1,415 men lost in the sinking of Hood on 24 May 1941. It was dedicated in late October 2008. It is located at the UK's National Memorial Arboretum near Lichfield, Staffordshire.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Portsmouth Naval Memorial Portsmouth Naval Memorial
The Portsmouth Naval Memorial in Southsea, Portsmouth, Hampshire is where the majority of Hood's final crew are memorialised. Members of the H.M.S. Hood Association gather here annually in November to pay respects to their fallen shipmates and loved ones.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Plymouth Naval Memorial Plymouth Naval Memorial
This Plymouth Naval Memorial in Devon, serves as the memorial for those men assigned to Plymouth and were lost at sea during the two World Wars. Ten men from Hood are memorialised there.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Chartham Naval Memorial Chatham Naval Memorial
This Chatham Naval Memorial in Chatham, Kent, serves as the memorial for those men assigned to Chatham and were lost at sea during the two World Wars. Thirteen men from Hood are memorialised there.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Halifax Naval Memorial Halifax Naval Memorial
The Halifax Naval Memorial in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada serves as the official memorial to for Canadian personnel lost at sea. Three men from Hood are memorialised there.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Portsmouth WW2 Memorial Portsmouth World War 2 Memorial
This memorial is dedicated to Portsmouth men and women who died in military service during the Second World War. The memorial will ultimately include the nearly 100 Portsmouth men lost in the sinking of H.M.S. Hood.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


St Georges Church, Southsea St. George's Church, Portsmouth
This was the site of the H.M.S. Hood Association's annual official service of commemoration for many years.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Hood Memorial at The National Memorial Arboretum (photo courtesy of David Evans Royal Hospital School
H.M.S. Hood has two connections to the Royal Hospital School: First, several lads who were lost in the sinking in 1941 had previously attended the school. Additionally, some children who lost fathers in the sinking of Hood would later attend the school. The second connection is the school's "Hood House". This highly successful House is known to have a number of relics related to the ship.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


St Anns Church, Portsmouth
St. Ann's Church, Portsmouth

This church is located on Portsmouth Naval Base. It features a Roll of Honour for Hood. The Hood Association has held (and continues to hold) annual services here.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Church of St John the Baptist, Boldre Church of St. John the Baptist, Boldre, New Forest
This beautiful old church was the favourite of Hood's final Admiral, Lancelot E. Holland. The church has been the site of a special annual public Hood commemorative service for many years now. Inside the church is a special area known as the "Hood Chapel."

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Hood Stones at Loch Eriboll The Hood Stones of Loch Eriboll
Located on Loch Eriboll in the Sutherland portion of northwestern Scotland are the "Hood Stones." This landmark has overlooked the Loch since 1935. Also in the region is the Eriboll Church, which features a memorial plaque to Hood.

Click on the photo to the left to learn more.


Cranes at the former John Brown and Company Shipyards, Clydebank Former John Brown & Co Shipyards, Clydebank
This was where it all began- the yard where Hood and many other key ships were built from the keel up. Though heavily redeveloped by construction of the Clydebank College, some notable features of the former shipyard are still recognisable. The most obvious items are the slipways and of course the famous 150 ft tall Titan Crane, which is open to visitors. Click here to learn more about the crane.

Click on the image to the left to learn more about the shipyard and to see photos of the site just before it was replaced by the college. Photo courtesy of Ian Johnston.


Helensburgh Golf Club, Scotland Helensburgh Golf Club, Scotland
In 1924 a male Club Championship competition was inaugurated. Hood was often anchored nearby in the waters of the Clyde around this time and the Club graciously extended the courtesy of the course to her officers. To show their appreciation, Hood's officers presented the Club with a trophy in 1926. This trophy became the Club's Championship trophy and is still played for to this day. In addition to the trophy, the Club was later presented with a framed photograph of the ship. It's plaque reads "From the Vice Admiral, Captain and Officers HMS Hood 1939-1940". The photo remains on display in the Club's lounge. Click here to learn more about Helensburgh Golf Club. Information courtesy of Tom Foster (Colonel Retd), Captain of the Helensburgh Golf Club.


Hood Street, Clydebank "Hood" Street, Clydebank, Glasgow
This street is named for the battle cruiser Hood. It is one of many streets in the area that are named for famous ships built at the John Brown & Company Ltd shipyards. It is located roughly 1 mile from the location of the former shipyard where Hood was built.

Click on the photo to the left to enlarge it. Photo courtesy of Ian Johnston.


Admiral Holland Pub The "Admiral Holland" Pub, Banbury Oxfordshire
This pub is named for VADM Holland. We understand there is little inside related to Hood or Holland. Located at Woodgreen Ave, Banbury, Oxfordshire, OX16 0AU.

Click on the image (courtesy of Stuart Tamblin, 2001) to the left to enlarge it.


Hood Street, Wellington, New Zealand
"Hood" Street, Wellington, New Zealand

This street is also named for H.M.S. Hood. It was formerly named "McKenzie Street", but was renamed following Hood's famous April 1924 visit to New Zealand. Photos courtesy of Phil Mackie, December 2002.

Click on the image to the left to enlarge it.


Mount Hood, Oregon, USA Mount Hood, Oregon, USA
Although not specifically named for battle cruiser Hood, this large volcano does share the same namesake- Lord Samuel Hood. Mount Hood, at 11,237ft/3,426m, is the tallest peak in the state of Oregon. The picturesque volcano is a popular draw for hikers, climbers and skiers. The nearby Hood river (and corresponding valley) were also named for 1st Lord Hood. Click on the image to the left to learn more about the mountain. Information and photo courtesy of the USGS/Cascades Volcano Observatory.


Admiral Hood Monument, Somerset Admiral Hood Monument, Somerset
This monument while not named for H.M.S. Hood, is dedicated to her namesake Lord Samuel Hood and his family- the Hoods of Butleigh. It was dedicated in 1831 and located on the south side of Reynald's Way, Compton Dundon. It was established roughly a mile from the Hood family home. The column stands roughly 110ft (34m) tall. Click on the image to the left to learn more about the monument. Information and photo courtesy of Tim Bramwell.


Port Hood, Nova Scotia, Canada Port Hood, Nova Scotia, Canada
According to researcher Catherine Gillies, Port Hood is another location named for Admiral Sir Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount of Whitley. She tells us that "when Britain took possession of Cape Breton Island from France at the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763, surveyors and engineers were sent out to do some mapping and to take stock of the local resources here in Nova Scotia. One of the cartographers --J. F. W. DesBarres (1721-1824) was working for the Admiralty during the years 1763-1774 mapping the coastline of Maritime Canada. Hood would have headed the North American station during this time period. DesBarres named this part of Cape Breton (on the west side of Cape Breton Island) Port Hood." Image courtesy of Google Maps.